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CATCH - The Southampton premiere of an award winning short film to mark World Antibiotic Awareness Week

Venue: Lecture theatre Room 2003, Building 46 (Physics), University of Southampton

Date: Tuesday 14th November 2017

Time: 7.00pm until 8.00pm

See the Southampton premiere of CATCH on TUESDAY 14th November at 7pm, Lecture Theatre Room 2003, Building 46 (Physics).

Free event/No booking required.


Professor Michael Moore will give a short talk followed by a Question and Answer session after the film.


Michael Moore is head of group for Primary Care and Population Sciences.  The group have a major strand of work on rational use of antibiotics in primary care where three quarters of antibiotics are prescribed.  They have published work on the use of near patient tests, clinical scores and just in case prescribing.  Their work has influence national guidelines and Professor Moore is now a member of the government advisory board for antibiotic stewardship (APRHAi).


In a near future where all antibiotics have failed, a father, Tom, and his young daughter, Amy, are quarantined in their house during a lethal pandemic.
When Amy gets sick, Tom must make an impossible decision: give her up to the authorities or risk infection himself.

Created with the help and backing of leading scientists in the field, CATCH takes a global health crisis happening now and brings the issue home, portraying a terrifying scenario that is closer than you think.

The film was written and directed by science television directors Paul Cooke and Dominic Rees- Roberts. Both are recent winners of The Wellcome Trust’s Emerging Talent programme for science communicators.


The film screening at University of Southampton is part of Southampton Film Week and is celebrating film across the City 11 - 19 November 2017.  

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